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Vol. 2, No. 9      May 3, 2006    

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Contact DSA
Darryl L. Sink & Associates, Inc.
One Cielo Vista Place
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone: 831.649.8384

Voicemail: 800.650.SINK (7465)
Fax: 831.649.3914
Workshops: Jane Sink, Vice President of Marketing

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Today's Tip
Video and E-Learning: New Opportunities for Instructional Developers

DSA would like to thank Dr. Tom Welsh for contributing this month's tip on using video in web-based training. Dr. Welsh is an active DSA Associate and Professor of Instructional Design and Technology at California State University, Chico. He regularly works on DSA e-learning projects and teaches the DSA workshop: Designing Instruction for Web-Based Training.

On a recent DSA project, a client wanted to convey the importance of a new training initiative to the company’s worldwide audience of employees. The client knew that the best way to reinforce the initiative’s importance and promote attitude change was to provide a direct appeal from the CEO. The problem was, how could they provide high quality video of the CEO and include the interactivity and tracking provided by web-based training without making the technology requirements burdensome on the employees?

Thanks to new video technologies for the web – in this case Flash Video – we were able to achieve all of the initiative’s goals, combining the interactivity of web-based training with high quality video, and LMS reporting, in one seamless solution that fits nicely within the standard software set installed on 93.5% of the world’s internet-enabled computers.*

Clearly, the web is ready to accommodate high quality video. With this in mind, here are four reasons to re-consider using video in web-based training:

  1. Video is one of the best mediums for conveying meaning and allowing authentic practice for instructional outcomes such as interpersonal skills, attitude change, and, to a lesser extent, procedures.
  2. Production costs have been driven down with the introduction of digital video cameras and desktop editing tools.
  3. Video files can now be streamed from any standard ISP or web server for immediate playback.
  4. Development tools, such as Flash, allow designers to Wrap interactivity around existing video content and deliver it all in one seamless package.

With web-based video, instructional designers have opportunities for enhancing the impact and instructional value of web-based training. Here are just a few examples:

  • While taking web-based training on selling techniques, a learner can view a video of a sales presentation and click a button when they see a specific technique in being displayed. They receive immediate feedback on their selection.
  • While taking web-based training on a new corporate-wide initiative, the learner receives a one-minute testimonial from an Executive VP regarding the importance of the initiative. After the short clip, the learner is more clearly focused and ready to learn.
  • While taking web-based training on how to put on emergency response equipment, the learner can view a video demonstration of the procedure along with text prompting. They can play, pause, rewind, and slow the demonstration as they practice with sample gear provided to them.

Of course, video production costs can significantly increase the overall budget for a training project. However, this is not always the case. Short, personal introductions to a course can be recorded and integrated at relatively low cost. In addition, if it makes sense to accept lower production values, video-based presentations of procedures and interpersonal skills in action can add depth and authenticity to web-based training.

Do you want to learn more about innovative instructional design techniques for web-based training? Check out DSA’s Designing Instruction for Web-Based Training workshop at http://www.dsink.com/calendar/.

Until next time,

Darryl

Dr. Peter HonebeinP.S. Dr. Thomas Welsh is an active DSA Associate and Professor of Instructional Design and Technology at California State University, Chico. He regularly works on DSA e-learning projects and teaches the DSA workshop: Designing Instruction for Web-Based Training.

Article © 2006 Darryl Sink & Associates, Inc


Training Development Tips

Welcome to Training Development Tips
, a DSA newsletter for Instructional Designers and Performance Consultants. Each issue will include at least one proven tip to help you get the most out of your development and consulting efforts.

Did you miss out on a past issue? For access to all tips newsletters, send your top "Tip" to jane@dsink.com.

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Get Credit For The Workshops You've Attended...

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Copyright, Darryl L. Sink & Associates, Inc.
Monterey, California

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